Showing posts with label architecture. Show all posts
Showing posts with label architecture. Show all posts

Monday, December 19, 2016

State Of The Evening ...



“I regard the theatre as the greatest of all art forms, the most immediate way in which a human being can share with another the sense of what it is to be a human being.”
                   ~ Oscar Wilde  
                                  ~1854-1900
 The State Theatre sparkles like a jewel in downtown Easton, Pennsylvania on a chilly November evening on Northampton Street.

State Theatre, originally known as Neumeyers Vaudeville House and now the State Theatre Center for the Arts, is an historic theatre. The building began to take its present form in 1910, when modified from a bank building to a vaudeville house. The building was extensively modified in 1926, to include a larger auditorium, balcony and lush decorations. At that time it was renamed “The State.” The building is asymmetrical with a cut stone Beaux-Arts style fa├žade and large overhanging marquee.


Beaux-Arts Architecture is a very rich, lavish and heavily ornamented classical style taught at L’Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris in the 19th century. The term “Beaux Arts” is the approximate English equivalent of  “Fine Arts.”

State Theatre was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.
 

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Saturday Night At The Roxy ...




“I adore the theater and I am a painter. I think the two are made for a marriage of love.
I will give all my soul to prove this once more.”
                      ~ Marc Chagall
                                ~ 1887-1985
     ~ on painting new ceiling for the Paris opera
                                ~ October 14, 1963

A crowd teems around The Roxy Theatre, Northampton, Pennsylvania to purchase their tickets to a Saturday night show on a warm May evening.

The Roxy originally opened in 1921 as the Lyric. This theatre was renovated in 1933 in the tremendously popular art deco style - and renamed The Roxy after the famous New York City theater and its namesake showman Samuel “Roxy” Rothapfel.

Today, as the city’s only commercial theatre, “the Roxy continues to be the greatest show in town,” presenting both Hollywood favorites and live entertainment. It features a seven rank Wurlitzer pipe organ.