Showing posts with label Ironton Rail Trail. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ironton Rail Trail. Show all posts

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

There Are More Fish In The Sea ...


“There are more fish in the sea”
      ~ A twist on the well-known idiom “there are plenty more fish in the sea,” used to console someone whose romantic relationship has ended by pointing out that there are many other people with whom they may have a successful relationship in the future. This expression alludes to the proverb there are as good fish in the sea as ever came out of it.

I spotted this rock painted with the words “There Are More Fish in the Sea!” on a mid-February afternoon in 2019 at Whitehall Parkway, just off the Ironton Rail Trail.

Then I thought I’d have some fun with it … why not put these fish in the sea?! So I blended it with “Tides of Dixie,” a shot I took of an autumn tide of the Atlantic Ocean rolling majestically into Coligny Beach on Hilton Head Island in the Lowcountry of South Carolina in October 2016.

The Ironton Rail Trail loops more than nine miles through Whitehall Township, the Borough of Coplay and North Whitehall Township in Pennsylvania.

The Ironton Railroad was a shortline railroad in Lehigh County. Originally built in 1861 to haul iron ore and limestone to blast furnaces along the Lehigh River, traffic later shifted to carrying Portland Cement when local iron mining declined in the early 20th century. Much of the railroad had already been abandoned when it became part of Conrail in 1976, and the last of its trackage was removed in 1984.

In 1996, Whitehall Township purchased 9.2 miles of the right-of-way from Conrail, transforming it into the Ironton Rail Trail.

This painted rock is likely part of the The Kindness Rocks Project, which was founded by Megan Murphy of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, who wanted to spread encouraging messages to strangers by writing them on rocks she found on the beach. The practice spread and launched similar projects across the United States.

The grassroots project encourages people to leave rocks painted with inspiring messages along the path of life. People are encouraged to take one, share one or add to the pile. You can see just how much impact she’s made when looking up #TheKindnessRocksProject. Learn more about how to join the movement at http://thekindnessrocksproject.com.

Monday, February 25, 2019

The Corn Crib In Winter ...



“I love the nostalgic myself. I hope we never lose some of the things of the past.”
    ~ Walt Disney
        ~1901-1966
I captured this high contrast monochrome shot of an old-fashioned corn crib on a mid-February afternoon in Whitehall Parkway, just off the Ironton Rail Trail.

Splashes of winter sunshine and a scattering of snow framed the corn crib, a type of granary used to dry and store corn.

This one has two small Pennsylvania Dutch hex signs on either side of its name. Hex signs are a form of Pennsylvania Dutch folk art, related to fraktur, found in the Fancy Dutch tradition in Pennsylvania Dutch Country. Barn paintings, usually in the form of “stars in circles,” began to appear on the landscape in the early 19th century, and became widespread decades later when commercial ready-mixed paint became readily available. By the 1950s commercialized hex signs, aimed at the tourist market, became popular and these often include stars, compass roses, stylized birds known as distelfinks, hearts, tulips or a tree of life.

The Pennsylvania Dutch are a cultural group formed by early German-speaking immigrants to Pennsylvania and their descendants. The word “Dutch” does not refer to Dutch people or language, but to the German settlers known as Deutsch in standard German and Deitsch in the principal dialect they spoke, Palatine German.

Most emigrated to the Americas from Germany or Switzerland in the 17th and 18th centuries. Over time, the various dialects spoken by these immigrants fused into a unique dialect of German known as Pennsylvania German or Pennsylvania “Dutch.” At one time, more than one third of Pennsylvania’s population spoke this language.

After the harvest and while still on the cob, corn is placed in the crib either with or without the husk. The typical corn crib has slats in its walls to allow air to circulate through the corn, both allowing it to dry initially and helping it stay dry. The slats expose the corn to pests, so corn cribs are elevated beyond the reach of rodents.

Corn cribs were first used by Native Americans and were quickly adopted by European settlers. Struggling European settlers often raided corn cribs for food. As a result, at least some Native groups abandoned the corn crib and buried food in caches.

Corn crib designs vary greatly. They were originally made of wood, but other materials such as concrete have also been used. The basic corn crib consists of a roofed bin elevated on posts. Another typical early American design has walls slanted outward. Most of the larger designs have an open space in the middle for accessing corn and promoting airflow. In larger designs, this space was often used to store wagons. By the early 20th century, the term “corn crib” was applied to large barns that contained many individual bins of corn. Today a typical corn crib on many farms is a cylindrical cage of galvanized wire fencing covered by a metal roof formed of corrugated galvanized iron. 

The Ironton Rail Trail loops more than nine miles through Whitehall Township, the Borough of Coplay and North Whitehall Township in Pennsylvania.

The Ironton Railroad was a shortline railroad in Lehigh County. Originally built in 1861 to haul iron ore and limestone to blast furnaces along the Lehigh River, traffic later shifted to carrying Portland Cement when local iron mining declined in the early 20th century. Much of the railroad had already been abandoned when it became part of Conrail in 1976, and the last of its trackage was removed in 1984.

In 1996, Whitehall Township purchased 9.2 miles of the right-of-way from Conrail, transforming it into the Ironton Rail Trail.