Showing posts with label General Harry C Trexler. Show all posts
Showing posts with label General Harry C Trexler. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Youngin' On The Range ...


“The wildlife and its habitat cannot speak, so we must and we will …”
       ~ Theodore Roosevelt
         ~ 1858-1919
       ~ Naturalist & Conservationist
     ~26th President of the United States
                    of America
            ~ 1901-1909
A sweet baby bison enjoys an early May afternoon on the range at Trexler Nature Preserve, Schnecksville, Pennsylvania, where I captured this portrait of an American Bison calf on a spring day as its mother grazed close by.

Bison live as a herd on the hillsides of the 1,100-acre preserve’s Central Range. When the late General Harry C. Trexler established the preserve in the early 1900s, he did it to save the American bison, elk and white-tailed deer from extinction and assure the species’ survival.

A conservationist along the lines of Theodore Roosevelt and John Muir, General Trexler understood the importance of nature and preserving wildlife in its natural habitat.
A successful businessman who amassed a fortune in the timber and cement industries and founded the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company, General Trexler began purchasing small farms in the low hills of Lehigh County in 1906. By 1913, he had transported eight bison and 20 Virginia white-tailed deer to the preserve. The elk followed soon after.

When General Trexler died in 1933, he bequeathed the property to the residents of Lehigh County. Today, the Trexler Nature Preserve is open to the public for passive recreation and nature watching.

The American Bison was designated the first national mammal of the United States on May 9, 2016. The majestic bison joins the bald eagle as a national symbol.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Simply Red ...


“All good things are wild and free.”
             ~ Henry David Thoreau
                    ~ 1817-1862
A beautiful red fox pauses to pose in the snow at Trexler Nature Preserve, Schnecksville, Pennsylvania, on a beautiful afternoon in early March.

I spotted this fox in the area where elk live as a herd on the hillsides of the 1,100-acre preserve’s Central Range.

When the late General Harry C. Trexler established the preserve in the early 1900s, he did it to save the American bison, elk and white-tailed deer from extinction and assure the species’ survival.

A conservationist along the lines of Theodore Roosevelt and John Muir, General Trexler understood the importance of nature and preserving wildlife in its natural habitat.

A successful businessman who amassed a fortune in the timber and cement industries and founded the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company, General Trexler began purchasing small farms in the low hills of Lehigh County in 1906. By 1913, he had transported eight bison and 20 Virginia white-tailed deer to the preserve. The elk followed soon after.

When General Trexler died in 1933, he bequeathed the property to the residents of Lehigh County. Today, the Trexler Nature Preserve is open to the public for passive recreation and nature watching.

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Little Parson Brown ...


“… In the meadow we can build a snowman
Then pretend that he is Parson Brown
He’ll say, are you married?
We’ll say, no man
But you can do the job
When you’re in town …”
                ~ “Winter Wonderland”
        ~ music by Felix Bernard,
              lyrics by Richard B. Smith
                             ~ 1934
“Winter Wonderland” is a winter song, popularly regarded as a Christmas song. Through the decades it has been recorded by over 200 different artists.

Just like a Little Parson Brown, this miniature snowman that I saw a little boy make sits in front of the Springhouse on one of the stone bridges at Trexler Memorial Park, Allentown, Pennsylvania on November 17, 2018, two days after the season’s first snowfall. The pre-Thanksgiving snowfall blanketed the region with eight inches of snow.

This log cabin was part of Springhouse, the summer home of General Harry C. Trexler (1854-1933) an American industrialist who built a business empire in Allentown. The park is his namesake.

I presented the image in sepia to enhance the nostalgic feel.