Showing posts with label Slatington. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Slatington. Show all posts

Monday, May 15, 2017

As Long As I'm Singing ...



“As long as I’m singin’
Then the world’s all right
And everything’s swingin’
Long as I’m singin’ my song

Ummmm…makin’ music
Is more to me than a pleasure
'cause me and music
We go together like notes in a measure

Long as I’m singin’
Then the world’s all right
And everything’s swingin’
Long as I’m singin’ my…

Long as I’m singin’ my …
Long as I’m singin’ my song.”
                 ~ “As Long As I’m Singing”
        ~written & recorded by 
                the wonderful Bobby Darin
                                    ~ 1964

A red-winged black bird sings its song on an early June evening at the Lehigh Gap in Slatington, Pennsylvania in the shadow of the Kittatinny Ridge, also called Blue Mountain.

The Lehigh Gap is a crossroads where the Lehigh Gap Nature Center’s trails connect two historic trails – the Appalachian Trail and the Delaware and Lehigh Heritage Corridor (D&L Trail).

The Appalachian Trail, a foot path, follows the ridge on both sides of the Lehigh Gap, running 1,245 miles south to Georgia and 930 miles north to Maine. Running from Wilkes-Barre to Bristol, the D&L Trail passes through the Lehigh and Delaware rivers and their canals in Pennsylvania.


Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Elvis & Johnny ...




“Well, it’s one for the money
Two for the show
Three to get ready
Now go, cat go

But don’t you
Step on my blue suede shoes
You can do anything
But stay off of my blue suede shoes …”

            “Blue Suede Shoes”
           ~ Written & recorded by Carl Perkins
                           ~ 1955
            ~ Recorded by the great Elvis Presley
                             ~ 1956

The King of Rock ’n’ Roll and The King of Country meet as a young Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash pose for a 1950s snapshot showcased on the wall of Charlotte Fay’s Main Street Diner, Slatington, Pennsylvania.

Elvis Presley’s “Blue Suede Shoes” may well be one of the hits you hear playing at Charlotte Fay’s, where retro is king at this cool and cozy eatery.

The King of Rock ‘n’ Roll is well represented at Charlotte Fay’s, joined by photos spotlighting retro icons such as Elizabeth Taylor and James Dean in the 1956 film “Giant,” Marilyn Monroe and Route 66. There’s also a nod to the New Jersey Seashore and Steel Pier. The large map depicts President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, championed by the then-president when it was formed June 29, 1956.

And of course there’s the tasty food, wonderful to nosh on as you drink in the nostalgic atmosphere. Owner Jason Ruff named the diner after both his great-grandmothers, and uses their recipes.

The menu and atmosphere are the perfect mix to stir up a recipe for success fit for a king.

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

A Kittatinny Winter ...


“Walk away quietly in any direction and taste the freedom of the mountaineer.”
                       ~ John Muir
                               ~ 1838-1914

The view from the Bobolink Trail, just off the Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor (D&L Trail) at Lehigh Gap delivers a beautiful vista of both sides of the snow dusted Kittatiny Ridge, also called Blue Mountain, on a winter afternoon.

The Lehigh Gap in Slatington, Pennsylvania, is a crossroads where the Lehigh Gap Nature Center’s trails connect two historic trails – the Appalachian Trail and the D&L Trail.

The Appalachian Trail, a foot path, follows the ridge on both sides of the Lehigh Gap, running 1,245 miles south to Georgia and 930 miles north to Maine. Running from Wilkes-Barre to Bristol, the D&L Trail passes through the Lehigh and Delaware rivers and their canals in Pennsylvania.

The Bobolink Trail connects the D&L Trail with the Lehigh and New England (LNE) Trail about 1.2 miles north and west of the Osprey House at Lehigh Gap Nature Center. The Bobolink Trail is named for the Bobolink, a representative of the migrant grassland bird species that the Lehigh Gap Nature Center hopes to attract to the refuge’s re-vegetated prairie grasslands.